Book Club

  • The Office of Diversity Inclusion, the D & I Alliance, and The Table Book Club are excited to announce the newest reading selection for the 2021-22 school term!

    The late Dr. James Loewen, renowned scholar and best selling author, expressed that Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee was for perfect follow-up to the last school term's reading selection titled, Lies My Teacher Told Me: Everything Your American History Textbook Got Wrong!"

    The Table Book Club will meet on November 16, 2021 via Zoom from 4:00 -5:30 p.m. to continue exploring the Racial Equity Institute (REI) recommended reading Bury My Heart At Wounded Knee!(2010 Version) Please join us at "The Table!" Please note that up to ten renewal points (based on attendance) will be awarded at the end of the series.

    This text was chosen for our book club officially named "The Table" by our Diversity & Inclusion Alliance. The Table Book Club is open to all District 7 faculty and staff members.

     

     

     

     

     

  • Bury My Heart At Wounded Knee

    by Dee Brown Year Published: 1970, 2010

    First published in 1970, Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee is Dee Brown's eloquent, meticulously documented account of the systematic destruction of American Indians during the second half of the nineteenth century. A national bestseller in hardcover for more than a year after its initial publication, it has sold almost four million copies and has been translated into seventeen languages.

    Using council records, autobiographies, and firsthand descriptions, Brown introduces readers to great chiefs and warrors of the Dakota, Ute, Sioux, Cheyenne, and other tribes, revealing in heartwrenching detail the battles, massacres, and broken treaties that methodically stripped them of freedom. A forceful narrative still discussed today as revelatory and controversial, Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee permanently altered our understanding of how the American West came to be defined.

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  • Lies My Teacher Told Me: Everything Your American Textbook Got Wrong

    by James W. Loewen Year Published: 1995, 2007

    Since its first publication in 1995, Lies My Teacher Told Me has become one of the most important―and successful―history books of our time. Having sold nearly two million copies, the book also won an American Book Award and the Oliver Cromwell Cox Award for Distinguished Anti-Racist Scholarship and was heralded on the front page of the New York Times.

    What started out as a survey of the twelve leading American history textbooks has ended up being what the San Francisco Chronicle calls "an extremely convincing plea for truth in education." In Lies My Teacher Told Me, James W. Loewen brings history alive in all its complexity and ambiguity. Beginning with pre-Columbian history and ranging over characters and events as diverse as Reconstruction, Helen Keller, the first Thanksgiving, the My Lai massacre, 9/11, and the Iraq War, Loewen offers an eye-opening critique of existing textbooks, and a wonderful retelling of American history as it should―and could―be taught to American students.

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  •  Why Are All the Black Kids Sitting Together

    Why Are All the Black Kids Sitting Together in the Cafeteria?

    by Beverly Daniel Tatum Year Published: 2017

    Walk into any racially mixed high school and you will see Black, White, and Latino youth clustered in their own groups. Is this self-segregation a problem to address or a coping strategy? Beverly Daniel Tatum, a renowned authority on the psychology of racism, argues that straight talk about our racial identities is essential if we are serious about enabling communication across racial and ethnic divides. These topics have only become more urgent as the national conversation about race is increasingly acrimonious. This fully revised edition is essential reading for anyone seeking to understand the dynamics of race in America.

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